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fail – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English failen, borrowed from Anglo-Norman faillir, from Vulgar Latin *fallire, alteration of Latin fallere (to deceive, disappoint), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰāl- (to lie, deceive) or Proto-Indo-European *sgʷʰh₂el- (to stumble). Evaluate Dutch feilen, falen (to fail, miss), German fehlen (to fail, miss, lack), Danish fejle (to fail, err), Swedish fela (to fail, be wanting, do mistaken), Icelandic feila (to fail), Spanish fallar (to fail, miss).

Verb[edit]

fail (third-person singular easy current fails, current participle failing, easy previous and previous participle failed)

  1. (intransitive) To be unsuccessful.

    All through my life, I’ve all the time failed.

    • 1577, Raphaell Holinshed, “[The Historie of Englande.]”, in The Firste Quantity of the Chronicles of England, Scotlande, and Irelande [], quantity I, London: [] [Henry Bynneman] for Iohn Harrison, OCLC 55195564, web page 249, column 1:

      In the event that they ſhoulde gyue battayle it was to be doubted, leaſt by treaſon amõgſt themſelues, the armie ſhould be betrayed into the enimies palms, the which might not fayle to execute all kinde of crueltie within the ſlaughter of the entire nation.

    • 2013 August 10, “A brand new prescription”, in The Economist, quantity 408, quantity 8848:

      Because the world’s drug behavior exhibits, governments are failing of their quest to observe each London window-box and Andean hillside for banned vegetation. However even that Sisyphean job seems to be simple subsequent to the combat in opposition to artificial medicine. No sooner has a drug been blacklisted than chemists modify their recipe and begin churning out a subtly completely different one.

  2. (transitive) To not obtain a selected acknowledged purpose. (Utilization be aware: The direct object of this phrase is often an infinitive.)

    The truck failed to begin.

  3. (transitive) To neglect.

    The report fails to take into consideration all of the mitigating elements.

  4. (intransitive) Of a machine, and so on.: to stop to function accurately.

    After working 5 minutes, the engine failed.

  5. (transitive) To be eager to, to be inadequate for, to disappoint, to abandon.
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Previous and Current, e book 3, ch. II, Gospel of Mammonism
      A poor Irish Widow […] went forth together with her three youngsters, naked of all useful resource, to solicit assist from the Charitable Institutions of that Metropolis. At this Charitable Institution after which at that she was refused; referred from one to the opposite, helped by none; — until she had exhausted all of them; until her power and coronary heart failed her: she sank down in typhus-fever […]
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 2, in The Mirror and the Lamp[1]:

      That the younger Mr. Churchills favored—however they didn’t like him coming spherical of a night and consuming weak whisky-and-water whereas he held forth on railway debentures and company loans. Mr. Barrett, nonetheless, by fawning and flattery, appeared to have the ability to make not solely Mrs. Churchill however everybody else do what he desired. And if the humanities of humbleness failed him, he overcame you by sheer impudence.

  6. (transitive, intransitive) To obtain a number of non-passing grades in educational pursuits.

    I failed English final yr.

  7. (transitive) To present a pupil a non-passing grade in a tutorial endeavour.

    The professor failed me as a result of I didn’t full any of the course assignments.

  8. (transitive, out of date) To overlook attaining; to lose.
  9. To be wanting; to fall brief; to be or turn out to be poor in any measure or diploma as much as complete absence.

    The crops failed final yr.

    • 1591, William Shakespeare, “The Second A part of Henry the Sixt, []”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Printed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene ii]:

      Until Lionel’s subject fails, his mustn’t reign.

  10. (archaic) To be affected with need; to come back brief; to lack; to be poor or unprovided; used with of.
    • 1757, Edmund Burke, A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Concepts of the Elegant and Stunning
      If ever they fail of magnificence, this failure is to not be attributed to their measurement.
  11. (archaic) To fall away; to turn out to be diminished; to say no; to decay; to sink.
    • 1667, John Milton, “E-book 8”, in Paradise Misplaced. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Misplaced in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:

      When earnestly they search / Such proof, conclude they then start to fail.

  12. (archaic) To deteriorate in respect to vigour, exercise, sources, and so on.; to turn out to be weaker.

    A sick man fails.

  13. (out of date) To perish; to die; used of an individual.
    • 1613, William Shakespeare; [John Fletcher], “The Well-known Historical past of the Lifetime of King Henry the Eight”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Printed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene ii]:

      had the king in his final illness failed

  14. (out of date) To err in judgment; to be mistaken.
    • 1667, John Milton, “E-book 1”, in Paradise Misplaced. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Misplaced in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:

      Which ofttimes might succeed, in order maybe / Shall grieve him, if I fail not.

  15. To turn out to be unable to fulfill one’s engagements; particularly, to be unable to pay one’s money owed or discharge one’s enterprise obligation; to turn out to be bankrupt or bancrupt.
Utilization notes[edit]
Various varieties[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under should be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry structure § Translations.

Noun[edit]

fail (countable and uncountable, plural fails)

  1. (uncountable, slang) Poor high quality; substandard workmanship.

    The venture was filled with fail.

  2. (slang) A failure (situation of being unsuccessful)
  3. (slang, US) A failure (one thing incapable of success)
  4. A failure, particularly of a monetary transaction (a termination of an motion).
  5. A failing grade in a tutorial examination.
Derived phrases[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fail (comparative extra fail, superlative most fail)

  1. (slang, US) That could be a failure.

Etymology 2[edit]

Unknown. Evaluate Scottish Gaelic fàl (hedge), Scots faill (turf). Attested from the 16th century.[1]

Various varieties[edit]

Noun[edit]

fail (plural fails)

  1. A bit of turf minimize from grassland.
Derived phrases[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English file, from Previous French fil (thread), from Latin filum (thread). Evaluate to Malay fail.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈfaɪl]
  • Hyphenation: fa‧il

Noun[edit]

fail

  1. file,
    1. a set of papers collated and archived collectively.
      Synonyms: berkas, dokumen
    2. (computing) an aggregation of knowledge on a storage gadget, recognized by a reputation.
  2. file rack

Additional studying[edit]


Etymology[edit]

From Previous Irish foil, from Proto-Celtic *wali-, from Proto-Indo-European *wel-. Cognates embody Historical Greek ἕλιξ (hélix, one thing twisted).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fail f (genitive singular faile, nominative plural faileanna)

  1. ring
  2. bracelet
  3. wreath
  4. sty

Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
fail fhail bhfail
Word: A few of these varieties could also be hypothetical. Not each attainable mutated type of each phrase truly happens.

Etymology[edit]

From English file.

Noun[edit]

fail (plural fail-fail)

  1. file (assortment of papers)
  2. info or a doc about somebody, one thing and so on.
  3. (computing) file (aggregation of knowledge on a storage gadget)

Derived phrases[edit]

Verb[edit]

fail (used within the kind memfailkan)

  1. file (commit papers)
  2. file (to archive)
  3. (computing) file (retailer laptop knowledge)
  4. (with untuk) file (make a proper request)

Previous Irish[edit]

Verb[edit]

fail

  1. Various type of fil

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