halo - Wiktionary
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halo – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Apostles Luke and John, with heads enclosed in halos

The halo, a U-shaped loop rising in entrance of the driving force

The primary letter “o” in “Good” is sporting a hoop halo, ceaselessly discovered with fictional angels

Etymology[edit]

From Latin halōs, from Historic Greek ἅλως (hálōs, disk of the solar or moon; ring of sunshine across the solar or moon; threshing ground with its surrounding threshold; disk of a protect); itself of unknown origin, see هلال‎ and תהילה‎. Utilized in English since 1563, sense of sunshine round somebody’s head since 1646.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

halo (plural halos or haloes)

  1. A round band of colored mild, seen across the solar or moon and so forth., brought on by reflection and refraction of sunshine by ice crystals within the environment.
  2. (astronomy) A cloud of fuel and different matter surrounding and captured by the gravitational subject of a big diffuse astronomical object, equivalent to a galaxy or cluster of galaxies.
  3. Something resembling this band, equivalent to an impact brought on by imperfect growing of images.
  4. (faith) nimbus, a luminous disc, usually of gold, round or over the heads of saints, and so forth., in non secular work.
  5. The metaphorical aura of glory, veneration or sentiment which surrounds an idealized entity.
  6. (artwork, faith, iconography) a round annulus ring, ceaselessly luminous, usually golden, floating above the pinnacle
  7. (medication) A round brace used to maintain the pinnacle and neck in place.
  8. (motor racing) A rollbar positioned in entrance of the driving force, used to guard the cockpit of a open cockpit racecar.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (luminous disc round head of saints in work): aureole, nimbus

Derived phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

halo (third-person singular easy current haloes, current participle haloing, easy previous and previous participle haloed)

  1. (transitive) To encircle with a halo.
    Synonym: inaureole

Associated phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • Webster’s Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967
  • “halo” in Douglas Harper, On-line Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2021.

Anagrams[edit]


Bikol Central[edit]

Verb[edit]

halo (hálo)

  1. to hush, to make or change into quiet

Noun[edit]

halo (hàlo)

  1. a pestle

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *salā (filth, dust)

Noun[edit]

halo m

  1. saliva

References[edit]

  • Matasović, Ranko (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Collection; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, pages 319
  • Revue celtique. (1888). France: F. Vieweg., p 374

Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

halo

  1. first-person singular current indicative type of halar

Cebuano[edit]

Different types[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

For the second noun sense, the monitor lizard’s timidity likened to cowardice.

Noun[edit]

halo

  1. a monitor lizard
  2. (historic) a cowardly tattooed man

Verb[edit]

halo

  1. to mingle

Etymology[edit]

Medieval Latin, from Latin halos, from Historic Greek ἅλως (hálōs, disk of the solar or moon).

Noun[edit]

halo c (particular singular haloen, indefinite plural haloer, particular plural haloerne)

  1. halo (atmospheric phenomenon)

Etymology[edit]

From Latin halos, from Historic Greek ἅλως (hálōs, disk of the solar or moon, ring of sunshine across the solar or moon; threshing ground; disk of a protect), itself of unknown origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

halo m (plural halo’s, diminutive halootje n)

  1. halo (atmospheric phenomenon).
  2. Comparable visible impact ensuing from undesirable, roughly round spots on an imperfectly developed {photograph}.

References[edit]

  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th version) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English corridor, German Halle, French halle, Polish hala.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈhalo/
  • Hyphenation: ha‧lo
  • Rhymes: -alo

Noun[edit]

halo (accusative singular halon, plural haloj, accusative plural halojn)

  1. corridor, very giant room

Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɑlo/, [ˈhɑlo̞]
  • Rhymes: -ɑlo
  • Syllabification: ha‧lo

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

halo

  1. Indicative current connegative type of halkoa.
  2. Second-person singular crucial current type of halkoa.
  3. Second-person singular crucial current connegative type of halkoa.

Etymology 2[edit]

From English halo, from Latin halōs, from Historic Greek ἅλως (hálōs).

Noun[edit]

halo

  1. halo
Declension[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Etymology[edit]

From Latin halos, from Historic Greek ἅλως (hálōs, disk of the solar or moon, ring of sunshine across the solar or moon; threshing ground; disk of a protect), itself of unknown origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

halo m (plural halos)

  1. Halo (atmospheric phenomenon)
  2. Comparable visible impact ensuing from undesirable, roughly round spots on an imperfectly developed {photograph}.

References[edit]

  • Nouveau Petit Larousse illustré. Dictionnaire encyclopédique. Paris, Librairie Larousse, 1952, 146th version

Additional studying[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Verb[edit]

halo

  1. first-person singular current indicative of halar

Noun[edit]

halo (plural hali)

  1. corridor, very giant room

Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Dutch hallo. Examine Malay helo.

Interjection[edit]

halo

  1. hi there

Etymology[edit]

Probably a denominative verb from Proto-Indo-European *h₂enh₁-s-lo- (with spurious h), from *h₂enh₁- (to breathe), whence animus.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hālō (current infinitive hālāre, good lively hālāvī, supine hālātum); first conjugation

  1. breathe
  2. emit, exhale, launch (fuel or perfume)
  3. be aromatic
    • P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid, E-book I, ll. 416 ff.
      Ipsa Paphum sublimis abit sedesque revisit
      Laeta suas ubi templum illi centumque Sabaeo⁠⁠⁠
      Ture calent arae sertisque recentibus halant

      [Venus] goes flying again to Paphos and sees fortunately once more her seat
      The place there’s a temple to her and 100 altars
      That warmly glow with Sheban incense and are perfumed by contemporary wreaths.

Conjugation[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

halo m (particular singular haloen, indefinite plural haloer, particular plural haloene)

  1. halo (atmospheric phenomenon)

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

halo m (particular singular haloen, indefinite plural haloar, particular plural haloane)

  1. halo (atmospheric phenomenon)

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English hallo.

Interjection[edit]

halo

  1. (when answering the phone) hi there

Etymology 2[edit]

From Historic Greek ἅλως (hálōs).

Noun[edit]

halo n

  1. halo (atmospheric phenomenon)
  2. buzz, hype

Declension[edit]

Indeclinable.

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the principle entry.

Noun[edit]

halo

  1. vocative singular of hala

Additional studying[edit]

  • halo in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Medieval Latin, from Latin halos, from Historic Greek ἅλως (hálōs, disk of the solar or moon).

Noun[edit]

halo m (plural halos)

  1. (astronomy) halo (atmospheric phenomenon)
    Synonym: auréola
  2. (faith, iconography) halo (luminous disc across the heads of saints)
    Synonyms: auréola, nimbo

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

halo m (Cyrillic spelling хало)

  1. (astronomy) halo (atmospheric phenomenon)

Etymology 2[edit]

From English hallo.

Interjection[edit]

halo (Cyrillic spelling хало)

  1. (when answering the phone) hi there

Synonyms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Medieval Latin, from Latin halos, from Historic Greek ἅλως (hálōs, disk of the solar or moon).

Noun[edit]

halo m (plural halos)

  1. halo (atmospheric phenomenon)
  2. halo (nimbus across the head of a holy determine)

Verb[edit]

halo

  1. First-person singular (yo) current indicative type of halar.

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Medieval Latin, from Latin halos, from Historic Greek ἅλως (hálōs, disk of the solar or moon). Associated to English and Danish halo.

Noun[edit]

halo c (particular singular halon, indefinite plural halor / haloer, particular plural halorna / haloerna)

  1. halo (atmospheric phenomenon)

Declension[edit]


Tagalog[edit]

Noun[edit]

halò

  1. combination
  2. combine (matter added to a combination)

Noun[edit]

halo

  1. pestle

Anagrams[edit]

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